A research on aristotle ethics

Once we see that temperance, courage, and other generally recognized characteristics are mean states, we are in a position to generalize and to identify other mean states as virtues, even though they are not qualities for which we have a name. If we imagine a life filled with pleasure and then mentally add wisdom to it, the result is made more desirable.

Nonetheless, an excellent juror can be described as someone who, in trying to arrive at the correct decision, seeks to express the right degree of concern for all relevant considerations. Aristotle makes this point in several of his works see for example De Anima a23—b7and in Ethics X.

Aristotle (384—322 B.C.E.)

Sometimes only a small degree of anger is appropriate; but at other times, circumstances call for great anger. Ethical virtue is fully developed only when it is combined with practical wisdom b14— Fourthly, it is identical with form when it takes on a form in its actualized and final phase.

He searches for the verdict that results from a deliberative process that is neither overly credulous nor unduly skeptical. Neither good theoretical reasoning nor good practical reasoning moves in a circle; true thinking always presupposes and progresses in linear fashion from proper starting points.

Of the former, people say that it is not possible add anything to it or take anything from it, and Aristotle says that virtue differs from art in that respect only in being more precise and better. This supplement to the doctrine of the mean is fully compatible with Aristotle's thesis that no set of rules, no matter how long and detailed, obviates the need for deliberative and ethical virtue.

What is most remarkable about Aristotle's discussion of akrasia is that he defends a position close to that of Socrates. Though written more than 2, years ago, it offers the modern reader many valuable insights into human needs and conduct. For when we know how to benefit a friend for his sake, we exercise the ethical virtues, and this is precisely what our happiness consists in.

For example, we ask, first, what a thing is, then how great it is, next of what kind it is. But egoism is sometimes understood in a stronger sense. For Aristotle, philosophy arose historically after basic necessities were secured.

The development of potentiality to actuality is one of the most important aspects of Aristotle's philosophy. The parts of the soul are divided as follows: Although Aristotle is interested in classifying the different forms that friendship takes, his main theme in Books VIII and IX is to show the close relationship between virtuous activity and friendship.

It follows therefore that true happiness lies in the active life of a rational being or in a perfect realization and outworking of the true soul and self, continued throughout a lifetime. The Doctrine of the Mean. The soul is analyzed into a connected series of capacities: It is not a process but an unimpeded activity of a natural state a7— The happiest life is lived by someone who has a full understanding of the basic causal principles that govern the operation of the universe, and who has the resources needed for living a life devoted to the exercise of that understanding.

Socrates' contribution was the expression of general conceptions in the form of definitions, which he arrived at by induction and analogy. How to Write a Research Paper on Philosophy and Ethics.

This page is designed to show you how to write a research project on the topic you see to the left. Use our sample or order a custom written research paper from Paper Masters. Virtue ethics is a philosophy developed by Aristotle and other ancient Greeks. It is the quest to understand and live a life of moral character.

This character-based approach to morality assumes that we acquire virtue through practice. Standard interpretations of Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics usually maintain that Aristotle ( B.C.E.) emphasizes the role of habit in conduct.

Aristotle & Realism Research Paper Starter

It is commonly thought that virtues, according to Aristotle, are habits and that the good life is a life of mindless routine. Even though Aristotle was a student of Plato, Aristotle takes a different approach to the world of ideas than Plato did. For example, Plato believed that the only true reality is that within ideas.

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Another way of defining 'ethics' focuses on the disciplines that study standards of conduct, such as philosophy, theology, law, psychology, or sociology. For example, a "medical ethicist" is someone who studies ethical standards in medicine.

A research on aristotle ethics
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Aristotle | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy